When it comes to planning a wedding, stress can easily turn a happy occasion into a nightmare (cue the bridezillas). Tasks like venue hunting and shortening the guest list have their issues, but wording your invites should be fun and stress-free. When you’re ready to share the big day, use this guide to write an invitation that’s perfect for you. 


Cover Your Bases

While it’s important for you and your partner’s personality to shine through, you can’t forget to include the who, what, when, where, and why. Let’s break it down from top to bottom. 

 

The Breakdown

 

 

Host Line

Whether it’s the bride’s family, the groom’s family, or a joint effort, the wedding hosts traditionally appear front and center. But that’s not the only route you can take. If your style is more modern, using a phrase like “together with their parents” is an easy go-to. And if t

he host line isn’t something you’d like to include, that’s okay too.

Pro Tip: If the hosts are married, put “and” between their names. Unmarried hosts should be stacked.

 

The Couple

This is the most important part! While this line is pretty straight-forward, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the details. Do you include only first names? Do you prefer both last names or just one? In a traditional wedding invitation, middle names are also included, but there’s no set rule of thumb when it comes to what, or what not, to include.

Pro Tip: This is the perfect opportunity to let your personality as a couple shine. Include what feels most comfortable, and what looks best within your chosen template.

 

Action Line

The action line is where you’ll invite your guests. Keep in mind that certain phrases communicate the type of ceremony you’ll be having. For example, “request the honor of your presence” often relays a religious service, while “request the pleasure of your company” can relay a secular one.

Pro Tip: Don’t be afraid to shake things up. A line like “invite you to share in their joy” makes for an easy, contemporary approach.

 

The Details

For the time, date, and location, make sure to be as straightforward as possible. To ensure your guests arrive confusion-free, spell out the date in words and avoid using abbreviations.

Pro Tip: Consider including your wedding website in the invitation so guests have easy access to information like hotel blocks and shuttle times.

 

Party Line

Or should we say the good stuff! Give you guests an idea of what’s to come after the ceremony. Will there be dinner and dancing to follow? Cake and merriment? Is the reception at the same place as the ceremony? Get creative but make sure to share the facts!

Pro Tip: The party line is a good place to show the couple’s personality. Something as simple as “good times and bad dancing to follow” can transform a traditional wedding invite into a personalized one.

 


 

At the end of the day, creating your invites may take some trial and error – but don’t forget to have fun with it. Play around with wording to bring your invites to life. For example, instead of “getting married,” add some color with phrases like “getting hitched” or “tying the knot.” Once you’ve settled on the perfect wording and template, make sure to save a few invites for yourself to include in a memory book celebrating your big day. 

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1 Response

  1. Sweety says:

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